(Book Idea) The High Cost of “Free”: Greedy Generations Addicted to the Blissful Ignorance of Big-tech’s Hidden Costs

*Book Ideas are not “works in progress,” because I am not actively working on them. Rather they are brainstormed ideas that are too patchy to be a cohesive post, yet too developed (at least as a framework) to simply sit among my masses of unpublished literary doodles.

Intro

Stocks and suicide are up. Fear and fertility are down. Secular churches preach trans-reality. Political Science has discovered a method for creating obsession over “microaggressions.” Diabetic gluttons burp against fat-shaming—while covered in scabs, with two hooves in the grave. Millions of single-mothers, married to government, demand everything for nothing. Millions of woman-hating men, addicted to mimicking procreation with each other’s rectum, call for the banning of medical consequences. Meanwhile, as an ongoing vehicle for this rot, tech giants have risen through the ongoing ashes by the myth of free: burying costs as a tool for gutting competition.

Big-tech monopolies are parasites, born by simply by an ability to scale the indulging of their hosts’ bad priorities. Few things are as addictive as the myth of free. Now, as the host herds file into the cattle-called Grindr, normals and sodomites alike bleat of fighting back against the big-tech parasites. For their facade of will, the herd thinly pretends to be everything they have committed themselves to rejecting: noble, prepared, selfless, forward thinking, and long-suffering. Like their historical cousins, those who call for aggressive change do not intend to fight at all—they intend only to anger, frighten, and conscript others into the insurrection. And like their historical cousins, they too will die as they live: slithering and skulking everywhere they go—with their head up and shoulders back (having learned from frauds like Napoleon, Nietzsche, MLK, Jordan Peterson, Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump, Pewdiepie, etc. about the art of mimicking character).

The common thread? Pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath, and sloth—the “seven deadly sins.”

But all that is too much to cover, so this writing will focus on an underlying theme: the High Cost of “Free,” and how greedy generations became addicted to the blissful ignorance of big-tech’s hidden costs.

Table of Contents

(1) The High Cost of Free Internet
(2) The High Cost of Free Email
(3) The High Cost of Free Texting
(4) The High Cost of Free Storage
(5) The High Cost of Free Shipping
(6) The High Cost of Free Returns
(7) The High Cost of Free Labor

(1) The High Cost of Free Internet

The cost of free internet is social retardation. Last night, I watched Gilbert Arciniega’s YouTube video titled “What teenagers looked like in 1991!” It was a dozen or so kids hanging out, many with bikes, talking about nothing, enjoying life. One kid asks another his age. The reply: “Twelve. I was born in 1979.” (I can relate: I was also twelve in 1991.) The video has two-and-a-half million views and twenty-two thousand comments. Almost all the comments were more than a little jealous: 40-year-old wishing to return to that time, and younger people wishing to have been a teen back then. The consensus how refreshing it was to watch kids in 1991—where no one was glued to a digital crackpipe.

A decade ago, Sherry Turkle wrote the book, “Alone together: Why we expect more from technology and less from each other.” In the book, and many like it, the author simply preaches to the choir about the misery of living among people who are addicted to technology. To say the least, generations who grew up online are socially retarded and know nothing, one moment to the next, about what anyone around them expects of them. Children learn to learn about social expectations through social commandments from weak parents, bad teachers, and terrible celebrities. It fails. The cost of free internet

(2) The High Cost of Free Email

The cost of free email is anxiety. With email, the social world interconnects constantly. Those of us who lived without email remember a time with nothing like the instant gratification of instantly sending a message anywhere in the world for free. For many years, email’s instant gratification was novel and delightful. Then, as email became stable and trustworthy enough for business, the instant gratification of email became indispensable. Along the way, email destroyed the gift of anticipation—replacing it first with expectation, then with impatience, and now with anxiety. Out on this digital limb, every sent message MUST, in seconds, reach the other side of the town, the state, the country, or the world—or else the sender feels like the world is ending.

(3) The High Cost of Free Texting

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(4) The High Cost of Free Storage

The cost of free storage is dependency. Those who cannot budget for online storage should definitely rethink getting online storage. Instead, the myth of free storage arose through the hidden cost of dependence on the company that hosts the files.

Facebook. No one signed up for Facebook because they wanted to hear a half-Harvard-trained socially retarded ginger Jew nerd named Mark Zuckerberg declare the contours of online etiquette. No one signed up for Facebook because they wanted to get genderized advice about “leaning in” from an likable Harvard-trained man-faced Jewish hag named Sheryl Sandberg. The real hook that got so many into Facebook was not even communication; people already had email for that. The real hook was storage: the ability to store and share pictures (and later video). It is as simple as that.

Now, Facebook accounts are little more than a place for Gen-xers and their parents—consumed with a fear of death and irrelevance—to hoard memories and cling to online friends in order to avoid the anxiety of making real friends in the actual world.

So the cost of free storage at Facebook is an addiction to sentimentality, mixed with two fears: (1) fear of abandonment, and (2) the related fear of missing out (aka “FOMO”). Ironically, millions miss out on living every day—by restlessly keeping their minds melted onto their digital crackpipe.

Myspace. By the way: before Facebook was Myspace. Both websites offered free storage for pictures. The big difference was that you could edit your own Myspace page—and user-edited Myspace pages were notoriously crazy and difficult to navigate. But at least they were unique. And a main reason that people left from Myspace to Facebook is because people starting choosing Facebook over Myspace to avoid people’s ugly Myspace pages. Then gradually more family and friends were on Facebook and not Myspace, so people simply wandered off from Myspace, which is now little more than a digital graveyard with millions of pages that have not been accessed in a decade or more.

(5) The High Cost of Free Shipping

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(6) The High Cost of Free Returns

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(7) The High Cost of Free Labor

—Walmart, etc.
——China, Bangladesh, etc.

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