Racist, anti-white myths as scholarship (RE: “What were the causes of the Sharpeville Massacre?” by Ashley Kannan)

Following is an analysis of an anti-truth synopsis of the 1960’s “Sharpville Massacre” in South Africa. The synopsis is excerpted from the enotes.com article, “What were the causes of the Sharpeville Massacre?,” authored by anti-truth activist Ashley Kannan, a middle school teacher in Illinois; yet the article well reflects the general tone and quality of the mainstream myths regarding apartheid South Africa generally, and the so-called Sharpville Massacre specifically.

SYNOPSIS

“The 1960 Sharpeville Massacre was the result of a peaceful protest regarding racist South African policies of apartheid. Pan African Congressional Leaders assembled close to 5,000 protesters to bring attention to such unfairness. The intent of the protest was for the South African government to rethink their Apartheid policies and abolish such practices. The protest mood was more festive than belligerent as the crowd moved towards the police station. The police response to the protest became the primary cause of the massacre.

“The police assembled and used disproportionate responses to the protest. The use of low flying aircraft to seek to break the crowd up would be one such measure. The police’s response to the stone throwing of the crowds was the use of armored cars and shooting on protesters.

“Many of the protesters were shot in the back, indicating that they were trying to run away from the police and were still pursued. The reports of men, women, and children running from the police presence like rabbits only feeds the imagery of their being gunned down in such a callous and cruel manner. This brutality is only emphasized by the police commissioner’s statements about what happened in Sharpeville: ‘It started when hordes of natives surrounding the police station…If they do these things, they must learn their lessons the hard way.’ In this statement, one can see the lack of regard for the life of Black South Africans, one in which state sanctioned violence can lead to massacre so easily.”

ANALYSIS

Adorable how the author paraphrases the quotation of the police commissioner, in an attempt to make the reader see, “It started WITH hordes of natives SURROUNDING the police station…If they do these things, they must learn their lessons the hard way.”

Meanwhile, the author is too inattentive to cover up his cover-up effectively; again, the actual paraphrased quotation reads as follows: “It started WHEN hordes of natives SURROUNDING the police station…If they do these things, they must learn their lessons the hard way.”

Hopefully, the middle school teacher teaches something other than grammar — because that first sentence is not the way English works. Instead, it would be: “It started WHEN hordes of natives SURROUNDED the police station…If they do these things, they must learn their lessons the hard way.”

But, again, we instead get this misleading paraphrase: “It started when hordes of natives surrounding the police station…If they do these things, they must learn their lessons the hard way.”

So what do you suppose is left out by that elipsis (…)? Well again: “surrounding” is pretended to be the verb, yet it clearly just modifies “natives.” So the verb was omitted by the elipsis. Well, what verb could the police commissioner possibly have used? What verb did “educator” Ashley Kannan carefull leave out of his fraud? Following are some possibilities of what the police spokesman actually may have said:

(1) “It started when hordes of natives surrounding the police station dindu nuffin. If they do these things, they must learn their lessons the hard way.”

(2) “It started when hordes of natives surrounding the police station peacefully begged for fair treatment. If they do these things, they must learn their lessons the hard way.”

(3) “It started when hordes of natives surrounding the police station began throwing rocks at officers and buildings. If they do these things, they must learn their lessons the hard way.”

After all, the author already gave himself away: “Pan African Congressional Leaders assembled close to 5,000 protesters. . . . The protest mood was more festive than belligerent as the crowd moved towards the police station. . . . The police assembled and used disproportionate responses to the protest. . . . The police’s response to the stone throwing of the crowds was the use of armored cars and shooting on protesters.”

Pro-tip: thousands of people throwing rocks at cops is not a protest. Of course then comes the blacktivist’s true colors: “But muh apartheid!” Fine. Whatever. Like NoFX said: kill all da white man. But that’s war, not a “protest.” Coward.

CONCLUSION

So here’s what we learned about the 1960 Sharpeville Massacre in South Africa from racist lying cowardly “educator” Ashley Kannan:

(1) thousands of people converged on a police station;
(2) far more than none of those people began attacking police with deadly weapons from within the mob of thousands;
(3) they were shot at;
(4) a small percentage were injured, and an even smaller percentage died;
(5) plenty people (the Ashley Kannans of the world) think it useful to misreport black behavior — either as part of a passive-aggressive propaganda strategy for an ongoing, undeclared race-war, and/or as part of their “racism of low expectations,” where they do not believe that any blacks are capable of acting any more civilized than the eerie savages of South Africa’s Parliament.

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